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Virtual Exhibition

Camí


Temps de Sibil·les
Start 30/09/2019
Exhibition held from September 7th to November 18th, 2006

Times of Sibyls and Sibyls of our times

Dr. Laura Borràs Castanyer

Universitat Oberta de Catalunya

 

 Josep M. Camí’s latest creative adventure sees the power of the world and the power of matter, gesture and denunciation allied with the potency of the tribute, the homage and he forging of a space which is at once Utopian and yet incriminatory. “Times of Sibyls” is the result of an in-depth look at art as a receptacle for the cultural imaginary, of a severe interrogation of the role artistic creation can play in our times and, lastly, of what can almost be considered initiatic research. The contemplation of the panel on display at the San Gil de Atienza religious...


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EXHIBITION PAINTINGS: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
Dies Irae i Lacrimosa dies illa
2005
Sculpture
Bronze

Here we find four sculptures, in this case presented in pairs, representing some of the problems we live with today and which we are all aware of. They are, respectively, pandemics, war, the depletion of the Earth’s natural energy and reserves, and climate change. The bronze, iron and steel used by Camí in these pieces sharpen the drama and impact of the overall group. As spheres cut down the middle, each speaks to us of current malaise. Dies Irae, the first semisphere, shows us a landscape after a battle. Each of the arrows stuck into it tell us that the struggle has ended, so that death is present. In this case, Camí emphasises the extreme bellicosity of the 20th century, the century of great wars. With the title Lacrimosa dies illa, on the other semisphere we find a cross, known the world over in reference to the Red Cross, a symbol we relate to aid. In this way, it is the other, the contrast of the war seen on the other semi-sphere.
Vaticinata est i Tellus sudore
2005
Sculpture
Bronze

Autoretrat 30-1-03
Sculpture
Iron, x-rays and neon

Dies Irae
2005
Sculpture
Bronze

Lacrimosa dies illa
2005
Sculpture
Bronze

Liber scriptus proferetur
2006
Sculpture
Marble, gold leaf, books, ashes, glass and iron.

The artist relates this work with the classical world and with domain of the sibyls, with specific reference to the Cumaean Sibyl. The sculptural piece is made up of three irregularly cut marble blocks, with three openings. Only in one of the blocks do we see that the orifices each have a book inside, referring to the only books that were saved from being burnt by the Sibyl in front of Tarquinius. These books contain the divine word, the revelation and the prophecies. For this reason, the artist does not allow us to open them, they are kept inaccessible, blocked by the glass and the iron bar.
Liber scriptus proferetur
2006
Sculpture
Marble, gold leaf, books, ashes, glass and iron.

Liber scriptus proferetur
2006
Sculpture
Marble, gold leaf, books, ashes, glass and iron.

Memento
2003
Sculpture
Iron, wood and magazines (O.N.S. 1947-1955)

This piece does not refer to the classical world, but instead expresses social denouncement while serving to recollect the artist’s own experiences. All the materials used by the artist are older and have a direct relation to him. In this way, they speak for themselves, here addressing a specific period in the sculptor’s life. The work presents examples of a publication of the Sisters of the Company of Mary, Our Lady religious order, first published in 1947 by Lestonnac, where we can see Christmas and other religious scenes. Through these images, Camí recalls his childhood. Born in 1947, the same year of the publication, he had his First Communion in 1955, the year the publication was ended. Further to this, the material itself takes on importance here. The stand presents us with a book beneath an old, rusty frame, set in a niche; in this way we can see a contrast between the book, an opening to reading, and details which refer to the niche and its suggestion of death.
L'Oracle d'Aung San Suu Kyi
2006
Sculpture
Iron and cedar of Lebanon

Detall de l'Oracle d'Eleonor Roosvelt
2006
Sculpture
Wood and lead

L'Oracle d'Eleonor Roosvelt
2006
Sculpture
Wood and lead

L'Oracle de Las Madres de Mayo
2006
Sculpture
Wood, iron and cloth

L'Oracle de Teresa de Calcuta
2006
Sculpture
Rusty iron, wood, charcoal and lamp

L'Oracle de Wangari Maathai
2006
Sculpture
iroko treated, rusty iron and seeds.

Quantus tremor est futurus
2005
Sculpture
processed pine, rusty iron and gold leaf

Josep Maria Camí shows us a window with an open and closed space, with wooden shutters allowing the elderly silhouette to observe or stop observing what is in front of her. Faced with the fear of what the future might hold for us, we can always close them to block it off, stopping us from knowing what is to come. In contrast, the wrinkled lady, cut out in a sheet of iron, makes us think of the inevitable passing of time. With this piece, then, Camí presents us with a play between the act of veiling and revealing; the older materials also point to time’s passing, affecting us all. With its variable, mobile character, the work is a metaphor of the changing, interpretable message of the Sibyls.
Quidquid tatet
2003
Sculpture
Iron and neon

In this sculpture, the artist presents us with a confrontation between light and darkness. The darkness is represented by a dark iron rod, while the light emerges from within. Darkness here expresses ignorance and our fears, which are dissipated by the light, the luminous message that the Sybils bring us. This message, materialised in light, struggles to leave its source and reach everyone, to all of those who need to know, those seeking answers for their concerns. The light is still the metaphor for the divine, which the artist postulates as the way to do away with the world of darkness, plagued with injustice, where we find ourselves.
Reliquiarum
2004
Sculpture
Steel, glass and bronze

Tellus sudore
2005
Sculpture
Bronze

Vaticinata est
2005
Sculpture
Bronze

Vita-ae
2000
Sculpture
Coral, lead, iron, ostrich egg, mirror and skull.

This work also has its origin in the classical world, also referring to the Sibyls. The name of the piece is inscribed at the base of one of the pieces in the group. Upon opening the box, we find two objects that at first might seem similar in terms of texture and shape. On the one hand there is a cranium set on a mirror, a symbol par excellence of death; the other, an ostrich egg, symbolises the opposite notion of beginnings, of the germination of life. Beginning and end are thus visible in this sculptural group, which also includes a mirror where we might be reflected. The skull on the mirror represents every person who might seek to have his or her image reflected.
Vita-ae
2000
Sculpture
Coral, lead, iron, ostrich egg, mirror and skull.

Voca me
2005
Sculpture
Iron and wood

A plumb line runs down the middle of this composition; the power of the word, or of writing, is seen with the cut of the object on the wood. The iron frame, for its part, marks off the space, a sort of canvas where the solitary artist is found in the centre of a deserted landscape. The passing of time, as in many of the artist’s works, is expressed through the rusty metal that surrounds the image. Solitude stirs our emotions, the very sentiment the artist seeks here to arouse.
delaldeaglobal.com
2002
Sculpture
Treated iron, steel, bones and eggshells.

Rèquiem per Mesopotàmia
2003
Sculpture
Treated and bronze metasequoia





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